Summer 2017 Links

Nuclear and Environmental

Nearing midnight: “Military solutions are now fully in place,locked and loaded,should North Korea act unwisely. Hopefully Kim Jong Un will find another path!”

Mehdi Hasan, “The Madman with Nuclear Weapons Is Donald Trump, Not Kim Jong-un.”

David Wallace-Wells, “The Uninhabitable Earth.”

NUKEMAP by Alex Wellerstein, and “Global Hiroshima: Notes from a Bullet Train.”

Elizabeth Kolbert, “Au Revoir: Trump Exits the Paris Climate Agreement.”

Fiona Harvey, “World Has Three Years Left to Stop Dangerous Climate Change, Warn Experts.”

Damian Carrington, “Arctic Stronghold of World’s Seeds Floods after Permafrost Melts.”

Benjamin Powers, “An Abandoned US Nuclear Base in Greenland Could Start Leaking Toxic Waste Because of Global Warming.”

Marc Ambinder, “The American Government’s Secret Plan for Surviving the End of the World.”

Mike Wehner, “Nature Throws Humanity a Softball, Provides Bugs That Digest Plastic.”

Stephanie Wakefield, “Field Notes from the Anthropocene:  Living in the Back Loop.”

Ed Simon, “Apocalypse Is the Mother of Beauty.”

Michael Marder, “Can Democracy Save the Planet?”

Peter Brannen, “Earth Is Not in the Midst of a Sixth Mass Extinction.”

Democracy Now, “Noam Chomsky in Conversation with Amy Goodman on Climate Change, Nukes, Syria, WikiLeaks, and More.”

Matt Mountain and Nathaniel Kahn, “The Tiny Edit That Changed NASA’s Future.”

Atomic: Living in Dread and Promise.

Hardcore History, episode 59, “The Destroyer of Worlds.”

Emmalie Dropkin, “We Need Stories of Dystopia without Apocalypse.”

And a recent ad by the University of Edinburgh for a Lecturer in Disasters.

 

Trump, Politics, and the National Security State

Sheri Fink and James Risen, “Psychologists Open a Window on Brutal CIA Interrogations.”

Perry Anderson, “The Centre Can Hold.”

Jacques Rancière, “Attacks on ‘Populism’ Seek to Enshrine the Idea That There Is No Alternative.”

Masha Gessen, “The Autocrat’s Language” and “Waking Up to the Trumpian World.”

McKenzie Wark, “The Spectacle of Disintegration.”

Christopher Lydon, “Noam Chomsky: Neoliberalism Is Destroying Our Democracy.”

Michiko Kakutani, “Human Costs of the Forever Wars, Enough to Fill a Bookshelf.”

Daniel Bessner, “A Very High Degree of Certainty in Future Military Operations.”

Ariel Dorfman, “What Herman Melville Can Teach Us About the Trump Era.”

Rebecca Solnit, “The Loneliness of Donald Trump.”

Emmet Rensin, “The Blathering Superego at the End of History.”

Sara Lipton, “Trump the Merovingian.”

Jeet Heer, “America’s First Postmodern President.”

Naomi Klein, No Is Not Enough.

Caleb Hannan, “The Short, Unhappy Life of a Libertarian Paradise.”

Lawrence Wright, “The Future Is Texas.”

And Vinson Cunningham, “Donald and Melania’s Last Judgment.”

 

Hyperarchival

Joe Fassler, “Keeping Track of Every Book You’ve Ever Read.”

Emily Manning, “Iconic Punk Label Dischord Just Uploaded Its Entire Archive to Bandcamp.”

Joshua Barone, “Brooklyn Academy of Music Puts 70,000 Archive Materials Online.”

Emily Drabinksi, “A Space for Pleasures of All Kinds: On Crusing the Library.”

James McWilliams, “Before a Million Universes: The Pros and Cons of the Digitized Whitman and His ‘Lost’ Novels.”

And “Dick Whitman on Walt Whitman: Jon Hamm Reads the Audiobook of a Long Lost Walt Whitman Novel.”

Jeff Charis-Carlson, “Iowa Writers’ Workshop Archive Costly to Search, UI Scholar Finds.”

Reports from the Gutenberg Galaxy.

Spencer Kornhaber, “Katy Perry’s Panopticon of Fun and Tears.”

And Michael E. Ruane, “Unsealed 75 Years after the Battle of Midway: New Details of an Alarming WWII Press Leak.”

 

Criticism and Theory

Racheal Fest, “What Will Modernism Be?”

Joe Pompeo, “Michiko Kakutani, the Legendary Book Critic and the Most Feared Woman in Publishing, Is Steeping Down from The New York Times.”

Introduction to “John Berger: A Retrospective,” special issue, Politics/Letters.

Mariam Rahmani, “Facing the Feminist in the Mirror: On Sara Ahmed’s Living a Feminist Life.”

Jaskiran Dhillon, “Feminism Must Be Lived: An Interview with Sara Ahmed.”

Cassie Thornton, “Feminist Economics and the People’s Apocalypse.”

Bruce Robbins, “Discipline and Parse: The Politics of Close Reading.”

David Golumbia, “The Destructiveness of the Digital Humanities (‘Traditional’ Part II).”

Sofia Cutler, “Cottage Industry,” and Arne de Boever, “Realist Horror,” reviews of Dead Pledges: Debt, Crisis, and Twenty-First-Century Culture, by Annie McClanahan.

Justin Slaughter, “C. L. R. James in the Age of Climate Change.”

Alexander R. Galloway, “The Swervers” and “Brometheanism.”

Bea Malski, “Pleasure Won: A Conversation with Lauren Berlant.”

Craig Hubert, “Live Theory: An Interview with Tom McCarthy.”

Mark Sussman, review of Typerwriters, Bombs, Jellyfish, by Tom McCarthy.

“Can We Criticize Foucault? An Interview with Daniel Zamora.”

Richard Marshall, “The Fall and Rise of Louis Althusser: An Interview with William Lewis.”

Francesco Giusti, “The Lyric in Theory: A Conversation with Jonathan Culler.”

Rhys Tranter, “Is Critical Theory Dead? Does It Have an Afterlife? An Interview with Jeffrey R. Di Leo.”

Sarah Burke, “This New Museum Imagines a World Where Capitalism Is Dead.”

McKenzie Wark, “Our Aesthetics.”

Eugene Thacker, “The Weird, Eerie, and Monstrous,” review of The Weird and the Eerie, by Mark Fisher.

Quinn DuPont, review of The Politics of Bitcoin: Software as Right-Wing Extremism, by David Golumbia.

David Sessions, “The Rise of the Thought Leader.”

Alex Blasdel, “‘A Reckoning for Our Species’: The Philosopher Prophet of the  Anthropocene.”

“The Universes of Speculative Realism,” review of The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism, by Steven Shaviro.

Terrence Blake, “Fallible Divergences: Literary Theory after Speculative Realism,” review of The World of Failing Machines, Grant Hamilton.

Andy Beckett, “Accelerationsim: How a Fringe Philosophy Predicted the Future We Live In.”

Sophie Lewis, “Cthulu Plays No Role for Me.”

James Duesterberg, “Final Fantasy: Neoreactionary Politics and the Liberal Imagination.”

Catherine Liu, “Dialectic of Dark Enlightenments: The Alt-Right’s Place in the Culture Industry.”

Carl Freedman, “Russia 1917: You Are There.”

Alci Rengifo, “Red Dawn: On China Miéville’s Urgent Retelling of the Russian Revolution.”

Benjamin Parker, “What Is a Theory of the Novel Good For?”

And Sadie Stein, “In Flight.”

 

Science

Lisa Zyga, “Physicists Provide Support for Retrocausal Quantum Theory, in Which the Future Influences the Past.”

Dave Mosher, “NASA Has a Job Opening for Someone to Defend Earth from Aliens.”

 

Literature and Culture

Judy Woodruff, “For Newly Named US Poet Laureate [Tracy K. Smith], the Power of Poetry Is Opening Ourselves to Others.”

Literary Hub, “90 Lines for John Ashbery’s 90th Birthday.”

Charles Bernstein and Tracie Morris, “Poetry Needs a Revolution That Goes Beyond Style.”

Ann VanderMeer and Jeff VanderMeer, “The Rise of Science Fiction from Pulp Mags to Cyberpunk.”

Seat 14C (great collection of contemporary SF).

Lee Konstantinou, “The Girl Who Almost Became a Zombie.”

“17776: What Football Will Look Like in the Future.”

Hilton Als, “Ghosts in the House: How Toni Morrison Fostered a Generation of Black Writers.”

Ian Bogost, “The Fidget Spinner Explains the World.”

Fredric Jameson, “No Magic, No Metaphor.”

Adam Kelly, “David Foster Wallace and New Sincerity Aesthetics: A Reply to Edward Jackson and Joel Nicholson-Roberts.”

Steve Paulson, “Getting Out of Our Normal Crap: George Saunders on Writing and Transcendence.”

David L. Ulin, “Denis Johnson Had Ruthless Honesty and Transcendent Power.”

Tobias Wolff reads Denis Johnson’s “Emergency.”

Laurie Penny, “In Science Fiction, the Future Is Feminist.”

Jane Hu and Aaron Bady, The Handmaid’s Tale, ‘Nolite te Bastardes Carborundorum.'”

Johanna Drucker, “Embittered Spinster,” review of A Quite Passion.

Wai Chee Dimock, “There’s No Escape from Contamination above the Toxic Sea,” review of Borne, by Jeff VanderMeer, and “5,000 Years of Climate Fiction.”

Andreas Halskov, “No Place Like Home: Returning to Twin Peaks.”

Sarah Nicole Prickett, “Eternal Return.”

Noel Murray, Twin Peaks Season 3, Episode 8: White Light, White Heat.”

Jedediah Purdy, “Fiery Heaven, Bastard Earth: The Cosmology of Game of Thrones.”

Aaron Bady and Sarah Mesle, Game of Thrones, ‘Dragonstone.'”

Jia Tolentino, “The Personal Essay Boom Is Over.”

Harris Feinsod, “Sub-Sub-Underground-Anti-Connoisseurship: Adrift with Allan Sekula.”

Sean Austin Grattan, Hope Isn’t Stupid: Utopian Affects in Contemporary American Literature.

Lindsay Meaning, “Dimensions of Identity,” review of Gaming at the Edge: Sexuality and Gender at the Margins of Gamer Culture, by Adrienne Shaw.

Robert Florence, “8-Bit Philosophizing in The Forbidden Forest.”

Patrick Klepek, “The Power of Video Games in the Age of Trump.”

Matt Margini, “Something is Rotten in the State of Lucis: On Final Fantasy XV.”

William Bradley, “With Reflection, without Fear.”

Haruki Murakami, “Reality A and Reality B.”

Jennifer Lunden and DeAnna Satre, “Evidence, in Track Changes.”

Citron Kelly, three poems.

Future Radio, “Song Books, featuring Andrew Hook.”

Andrew Hook, ed., Elasticity: The Best of Elastic Press.

Mike Good, “Absence Tangibly Felt,” review of Post-, by Wayne Miller.

Kimberly Ann Southwick, “Three Chapbooks: Reinventing Prose Poetry for a New Century.”

Lauren Russell, “I Keep Thinking I Want to Get Married When What I Mean Is Safety.”

Eric Van Allen, “The FIFA Goal That Just Wouldn’t Go In.”

And Clayton Purton, “This Woman Has Been Slowly Eating Infinite Jest for a Year.”

 

Creative Writing

Kate Southwood, “‘Write What You Know’ Is Not Good Writing Advice.”

Stephen Hunter, “If You Want to Write a Book, Write Every Day or Quit Now.”

 

Humanities and Higher Education

Amy Hungerford, “Why the Yale Hunger Strike Is Misguided.”

Sarah Brouillette, Annie McClanahan, and Snehal Shingavi, “Risk Reason/ The Wrong Side of History: On the Yale University Unionization Efforts.”

Alyssa Battistoni, “Why I’m Fasting with Other Graduate Students at Yale.”

Eric Hayot, “The Profession Does Not Need the Monograph Dissertation.”

Chad Wellmon and Andrew Piper, “Publication, Power, and Patronage: On Inequality and Academic Publishing.”

Michael Meranze, “Remaking the University: The Idea of the English University,” review of Speaking of Universities, by Stefan Collini.

Oliver Bateman, “The Young Academic’s Twitter Conundrum.”

Jerry Coyne, “A New Academic Hoax: A Bogus Paper on ‘the Conceptual Penis’ Gets Published in a ‘High Quality Peer-Reviewed’ Social Science Journal.”

Francine Prose, “Humanities Teach Students to Think. Where Would We Be without Them?”

Ico Maly, “The End of Academia.edu: How Business Takes Over, Again.”

Sarah Bond, “Dear Scholars, Delete Your Account At Academia.Edu.”

Jeffrey J. Cohen, “Drinking and Conferencing.”

Deborah K. Fitzgerald, “Our Hallways Are Too Quiet.”

Sari Lesk, “UWSP Student Asks Court to Force Poetry Professor to Give Her an A.”

Jackson McHenry, “Maria Bamford Spent Her Commencement Address Discussing Exactly How She Negotiated Her Fee.”

And Susan Harlan, “Facebook Genres for English Professors.”

 

Pittsburgh

Cecilia Kang, “Pittsburgh Welcomed Uber’s Driverless Car Experiment. Not Anymore.”

And Jason Peck and Mike Good, “Local Spotlight: Pittsburgh’s Long-Running Poetry Reading Series Turns 42.”

 

And For the First Time . . . Oneonta, New York

Lisa W. Foderaro, “For Oneonta’s Aging Downtown, a $10 Million Face-Lift.”

Fall Semester 2017

I am looking forward to my first fall semester at Hartwick College. I’ll be teaching three classes: Introduction to Creative Writing (ENGL 213); Reading Modern Poetry (ENGL 250); and Creative Writing: Poetry (ENGL 312). This semester is especially exciting because I will be returning to the creative writing classroom, and, I mean, look at all this poetry:

I’ll post syllabi when they’re complete. No class blogs this semester, but probably soon, especially if I do something new this spring.

Reading at Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series on June 13, 2017

I recently read  at the Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series, and you can listen to (and download) it here. I read “We’re Just Like Yesterday’s Headlines,” “Throw Out Your Life,” and “The Shape of Things I,” all from my forthcoming collection, The Shape of Things, due out soon from Salò Press.

You can also hear the other poets here: Nikki Allen, Jennifer Jackson Berry, Jason Irwin, Sharon Fagan McDermott, Kayla Sargeson. It was a really nice evening filled with wonderful verse. Thanks all.

Poets who read at Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series, June 13, 2017. Back row, left-to-right: Jimmy Cvetic, Bradley J. Fest, Sharon Fagan McDermott, and Joan Bauer; front row, left-to-right: Nikki Allen, Jennifer Jackson Berry, Kayla Sargeson, and Jason Irwin.

End of the Semester Links, Spring 2017

It’s been a long year, long for many reasons, but here’s a backlog of some links. (Some very good news is imminent. . . .)

 

Nuclear and Environmental

New York Times Editorial Board, “The Finger on the Nuclear Button.”

Rebecca Savranksy, “US May Launch Strike if North Korea Moves to Test Nuclear Weapon.”

Kaveh Waddell, “What Happens if a Nuclear Bomb Goes Off in Manhattan.”

Radiolab, “Nukes.”

Laurel Wamsley, “Digitization Unearths New Data From Cold War-Era Nuclear Test Films.”

Michael Biesecker and John Flesher, “President Trump Institutes Media Blackout at EPA.”

Brian Kahn, “The EPA Has Started to Remove Obama-Era Information.”

Zoë Schlanger, “Hackers Downloaded US Government Climate Data and Stored It on European Servers as Trump Was Being Inaugurated.”

Cass R. Sunstein, “Making Sense of Trump’s Order on Climate Change.”

Laurie Penny, “The Slow Confiscation of Everything.”

Jonathan O’Callaghan, “What’s Going on at Fukushima.”

Bill McKibben, “A Bad Day for the Environment, with Many More to Come.”

Andrew Bast, “Unpredictable.”

Youssef El-Gingihy, “World War 3 Is Coming. . . .”

Taylor Link, “Democrats Propose Legislation to Prevent Donald Trump from Launching a Nuclear First Strike.”

Peter Maass, “Trump Official Obsessed Over Nuclear Apocalypse. . . .”

Christopher Schaberg, “Trump in the Anthropocene.”

David Farrier, “How the Concept of Deep Time Is Changing.”

Frank Heath, “A Prime Condition.”

J. Daniel Elam, “The Temporal Order of Modernity Has Changed: J. Daniel Elam in Conversation with Amitav Ghosh on the Anthropocene, Climate Change, and World Literature.”

Dan Levin, “A Chunk of the Arctic Stops By for a Photo Shoot.”

And Pieter Lemmens and Yuk Hui, “Apocalypse, Now! Peter Sloterdijk and Bernard Stiegler on the Anthropocene.”

 

Science

Fiona MacDonald, “Scientists Have Confirmed a Brand New Phase of Matter: Time Crystals.”

Lingo Andrewust, “Parallel Universes Are Real and Will Soon Be Testable, Researchers Say.”

 

Trump and the National Security State

Naomi Klein, “Get Ready for the First Shocks of Trump’s Disaster Capitalism.”

Masha Gessen, “The Styrofoam Presidency” and “The Real Madman.”

Alberto Toscano, “Notes on Late Fascism.”

W. J. T. Mitchell, “American Psychosis: Trumpism and the Nightmare of History.”

Francine Prose, “Forget Protest: Trump’s Actions Warrant a General National Strike.”

Perry Anderson, “Passing the Baton.”

Rick Perlstein, “I Thought I Understood the American Right. Trump Proved Me Wrong.”

Colin Dayan, “White Dogs on Track in Trump’s America.”

Richard Beck, “The Syria Catastrophe.”

Elizabeth Drew, “Terrifying Trump.”

Roger Berkowitz, “Why Arendt Matters: Revisiting The Origins of Totalitarianism.”

New York Times Editorial Board, “President Bannon?”

Gregg LaGambina, “The Revolutionary Force of Stupidity: A Conversation with Matt Taibbi.”

Robert Zaretsky, “Achtung Maybe: Reverence in the Age of Trump.”

Dan Sinykin, “We Wish You Great Harm.”

Judith Levine, “The Bartleby Strategy.”

Paul Holdengraber, “Paul Auster on Activism, James Baldwin, and the Horrors of Trump.”

“An Open Letter to Trump from the US Press Corps.”

Intercepted Podcast, “We Are All in Trump’s Hunger Games Now” and “Could Trump Start World War III?”

And Conor Friedersdorf, “The Significance of Millions in the Streets.”

 

Economics

boundary 2‘s conference: Neoliberalism, Its Ontology and Genealogy: The Work and Context of Philip Mirowski.

Gerry Mullany, “World’s 8 Richest Men Have as Much Wealth as the Bottom Half, Oxfam Says.”

George Monbiot, “Dark Arts.”

Robert Seguin, “Farmers and Foodies of the Future.”

And “David Harvey’s Course on Marx’s Capital: Volumes 1 and 2 Now Available Free Online.”

 

Social Justice

Kwame Anthony Appiah, “There Is No Such Thing as Western Civilization.”

Justin Campbell, “A Voice in the Wilderness: An Interview with Micah White.”

William C. Anderson, “New World Anxiety.”

Peggy Kamuf, “Who Has the Right to Move?: On ‘It Is Obvious from the Map’.”

 

Criticism and Theory

Danny Postel, “Moving Targets: An Interview with Tzvetan Todorov.”

Françoise Meltzer, “Tzvetan Todorov (1939-2017).”

Robert Zaretsky, “A Philosopher of Otherness Dies When He’s Needed Most.”

Alexander R. Galloway, “An Interview with McKenzie Wark.”

Gabriel Rockhill, “The CIA Reads French Theory: On the Intellectual Labor of Dismantling the Cultural Left.”

Samuel Freeman, “The Headquarters of Neo-Marxism.”

Mark B. N. Hansen, “Bernard Stiegler, Philosopher of Desire?”

Simon Reynolds, “Mark Fisher’s k-punk Blogs Were Required Reading for a Generation.”

Tom Syverson, “Capitalism Is Despair and It’s Time to Start Taking It Personally.”

Roger Luckhurst, “Making Sense of The Weird and the Eerie.”

Dan Hassler-Forest, Ellie Mae O’Hagan, Mark Bould, Roger Luckhurst, Carl Freedman,  and Jeremy Gilbert, “Mark Fisher: In Memoriam.”

Zero Books, “Capitalist Realism and Mr. Robot.”

Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen and Devika Sharma, “Critique’s Persistence: An Interview with Sianne Ngai.”

Paul A. Bové, “Rita Felski and Alt-Critique.”

Salmon, “Derrida vs. the Rationalists.”

Robert T. Tally, Jr., review of The Birth of Theory, by Andrew Cole.

Tom Eyers, Speculative Formalism: Literature, Theory, and the Critical Present.

Jesper Juul, “The Darkening of Play.”

Adam Kotsko, “Žižek and ‘the Left'” and “On the Coming Apocalypse.”

Len Gutkin, review of The Limits of Critique, by Rita Felski, and Cool Characters, by Lee Konstantinou.

“V21 Forum on Strategic Presentism,” in Victorian Studies.

Jayda Coons, “Unveiling Desire, Affirming Pleasure,” review of V21 special issue of b2o: An Online Journal.

Shut Down LD50 Gallery.

The Freedom after Neoliberalism Project.

And “Reviews of Peer-Reviewed Journals in the Humanities and Social Sciences.”

 

Hyperarchival

Sheila Liming, “In Praise of Not Not Reading.”

Alex Good, “The Rising Tide of Academic Aliteracy.”

Henry Martin Lloyd, “In Praise of Slowness.”

The Office Hour, “Refusing to Read.”

Scott Selisker, “Culture Machines: On Ed Finn’s What Algorithms Want.”

James Somers, “Torching the Modern-Day Library of Alexandria.”

Mark McGurl, “Feeling Like the Internet.”

David Golumbia, “The Destructiveness of the Digital.”

Patrick Jagoda, “Networks in Literature and Media.”

Peter Dockrill, “NASA Just Made All the Scientific Research It Funds Available for Free.”

John Seabrook, “The Invisible Library.”

Anotonio A. Casilli, “Never Mind the Algorithms: The Role of Click Farms and Exploited Labor in Trump’s Election.”

And “Announcing The Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition.”

 

Literature and Culture

Cormac McCarthy, “The Kekulé Problem: Where Did Language Come From?”

Jennifer Schuessler, “In a Walt Whitman Novel, Lost for 165 Years, Clues to Leaves of Grass and “Confronting Academia’s Ties to Slavery.”

Zachary Turpin, ed., “Walt Whitman’s Newly Discovered ‘Jack Engle,'” special issue, Walt Whitman Quarterly Review.

Eve L. Ewing, “Why Authoritarians Attack the Arts.”

Amitav Ghosh, “Writing the Unimaginable.”

Edward Jackson , Xavier Marcó del Pont, and Tony Venezia, eds., “David Foster Wallace,” special issue, Orbit.

Deidre Coyle, “Men Recommend David Foster Wallace to Me.”

Daniel Cohen, “Interview with Mark Greif.”

Anne Anlin Cheng, “The Ghost in the Ghost.”

Gerry Canavan, “Utopia in the Time of Trump.”

Sean Austin Grattan, Hope Isn’t Stupid: Utopian Affects in Contemporary American Literature.

Rebecca Evans, “What It Feels Like When Your World Ends.”

Ian Bogost, “Video Games Are Better without Stories.”

Nick LaLone, “More Than Affordances: Limitations and the Systems They Create,” review of Play Anything, by Ian Bogost.

Austin Walker, “Stories in Games Aren’t Problems, They’re Solutions.”

Graham Oliver, “The Field of Dreams Approach: On Writing About Video Games:
Tony Tulathimutte on the Future of Video Game Criticism.”

Salvatore Pane, “You Guys Are the Best: Friendship and Grieving in Final Fantasy XV, Night in the Woods is the Working Class Fiction I’ve Been Waiting For,” and Kristaps Saves Madison Square Garden.

Brian Whitener, “Cruel Pessimism,” review of Dead Pledges: Debt, Crisis, and Twenty-First-Century Culture, by Annie McLanahan.

Alexandra Alter, “Sci-Fi Writer William Gibson Reimagines the World after the 2016 Election.”

W. Oliver Baker, “Words are Things”: The Settler Colonial Politics of Post Humanist Materialism In Cormac McCarthy’s Blood Meridian.”

Evan Calder Williams, “Evening Will Come.”

Victoria Newton Ford, Get Out, Claudia Rankine, and the Horror of Black Hypervisibility.”

Dan Hassler-Forest, “Politicizing Star Wars: Anti-Fascism vs. Nostalgia in Rogue One.”

Lee Konstantinou, “The Yurt of Fiction” and “Comics Studies Comes of Age.”

Ajay Singh Chaudhary, “DOOMguy Knows How You Feel.”

Darryl Pinckney, “Under the Spell of James Baldwin.”

Charles Bernstein, “Lyric Shame.”

Megan Garber, “Are We Having Too Much Fun?”

Johnny Cook, “Playwrights Local to Premiere New Play with Music about Poet Wallace Stevens.”

PLINTH, no. 7.

Matthew Rohrer, “Mars Is a Stupid Planet.”

Jeanne Marie Laskas, “To Obama with Love, Hate, and Desperation.”

Michael Dowdy, “Poetry from a Year of Precarity.”

Frank Guan, “Why Ever Stop Playing Videogames.”

Robin Pogrebin, “In Walden Video Game, the Challenge Is Stillness.”

Ryan Pierson, “Too Close, Not Blue: Yellow Submarine.”

David Horvitz with Alexander Provan, “Ask the Stone to Say.”

Rachel Nagelberg, an excerpt from The Fifth Wall.

Gigantic Sequins 8, no. 1.

Review of Giantic Sequins 8, no. 1.

Mike Good, review of Better Luck Next Year, by Ally Malinenko.

Rachel Mennies, “Echo and Narcissus, Pittsburgh.”

After Happy Hour Review, no. 7.

Nick Greer, “Transmigration/Thule.”

And Owen Vince, Everything, Desire.

 

Humanities and Higher Education

Miya Tokumitsu, “In Defense of the Lecture.”

Thomas P. Campbell, “The Folly of Abolishing the NEA.”

Lee Gardner, “Why It Matters That Trump Wants to Kill the NEA and the NEH.”

“Some Colleges Have More Students From the Top 1 Percent Than the Bottom 60.”

Josh Roiland, “A Shot in the Arm.”

Kevin Birmingham, “The Great Shame of Our Profession.”

Blaine Greteman, “Don’t Blame Tenured Academics for the Adjunct Crisis.”

Lee Hall, “I Am an Adjunct Professor Who Teaches Five Classes: I Earn Less than a Pet-Sitter.”

Nell Gluckman, “Universities Take Steps to Improve Working Conditions for Adjuncts.”

Alana Cattapan, “Time-Sucking Academic Job Applications Don’t Know Enormity of What They Ask.”

Joshua Eyler, “Against Student Shaming.”

Scott Jaschik, “New York Adopts Free Tuition.”

Yasmin Nair, “The Dangerous Academic Is an Extinct Species.”

And Marika Seigel, “Action Items on Your Radical Professor’s Liberal Agenda.”

 

Pittsburgh

Anya Litvak and Chris Potter, “Local Firm Envisions a Nuclear-Waste Moat for Trump’s Border Wall.”

And Lucas Peterson, “Built on Steel, Pittsburgh Now Thrives on Culture.”

Upcoming Readings on May 18 and June 13

I will be giving two poetry readings in Pittsburgh over the next couple months.

On May 18, 2017 I will be reading at Piccolo Forno at 7:00 pm to accompany the release of issue 7 of the After Happy Hour Review. Also reading will be Bob Hartley, Daniel Parme, Celine Roberts, and Daniel M. Shapiro.

On June 13, 2017 I will be reading at the Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series. Also reading will be Nikki Allen, Jennifer Jackson Berry, Jason Irwin, Sharon Fagan McDermott, and Kayla Sargeson.