May Links

May 22, 2015

It’s been a busy month, and a there’s a bunch of stuff to catch up on, so links:

 

Disaster and Environment

David Roberts, “The Awful Truth about Climate Change No One Wants to Admit.”

Sarah Resnick, “A Note on the Long Tomorrow.”

Phil Plait, “Jovian Armageddon +20.”

Jamie Lauren Keiles, “Millennial Revenge Fantasy.”

“Texas Governor Signs Law to Prohibit Local Fracking Bans.”

Maureen McHugh, David Rieff, Benjamin Kunkel, Joseph McElroy, Srikanth Reddy, and Ted Nelson: “Speculations Archive: Overextending Ourselves.”

 

Politics

“Media Blackout over Massive Police Brutality Protests in Baltimore.”

“10,000 Strong Peacefully Protest in Downtown Baltimore, Media Only Report the Violence and Arrests of Dozens.”

Jon Swaine, Paul Lewis, and Oliver Laughland, “Troops Roll into Baltimore as Obama Urges US to Start ‘Soul Searching.'”

Alexis C. Madrigal, “These Are the Most Striking Pictures of the Freddie Gray Protests in Baltimore.”

Radical Faggot, “In Support of Baltimore: or; Why Smashing Police Cars Is a Logical Political Strategy.”

David Simon, “Baltimore.”

Pablo Iglesias, “The Left Can Win.”

President Obama at the White House Correspondents’ Dinner:

 

National Security State

Seymour M. Hersh, “The Killing of Osama bin Laden.”

Elias Isquith, “The Vindication of Edward Snowden: How a New Court Decision Cements the Whistle-Blower’s Legacy.”

Seth Stevenson, “Grim Carnival: The Baffling Reasoning of the Jury That Just Sentenced Dzhokhar Tsarnaev to Death.”

Zach Blas, Face Cages (2013-15).

 

Hyperarchival

Ashleigh Kane, “Cybernetics and the Post-Surveillance Age.”

Daniel Peterson, “One Hundred Thousand Landscapes.”

The Stan Brakhage Collection.

Joe Fassler, “Writing Should Be a Continued Exploration,” an interview with Mark Z. Danielewski about, among other things, his twenty-seven volume novel, The Familiar (2015-    ).

 

Literature and Culture

William Pierce, “Reality Hunger: The Six Books of Karl Ove Knausgaard, Part III.”

Seth Colter Walls, “What Philip Glass Learned from Samuel Beckett.”

Matthew Schniper, Fight Club 2: The Return of Tyler Durden.”

Kimberly Joki, “Jane Austen’s Fight Club: No Corsets. No Hat Pins. And No Crying”:

Veronica Fitzpatrick, “Meditations in an Emergency: The Final Episodes of Mad Men.”

Emily Nussbaum, “The Original, Resonant, Existentially Brilliant Mad Men Finale.”

Lili Loufbourow and Phillip Maciak, Mad Men: Season 7: ‘Time and Life.'”

Mad Men and the Coke Jingle Theory.”

Matt Zoller Seitz, Mad Men Finale: I’m Okay, You’re Okay.”

Jon Teti, Mad Men: ‘Person to Person.'”

Marc Campbell, “The Mind-Meltingly Brilliant Mad Max: Fury Road Gives Cinema a Shock to the System.”

Sean Nelson, Mad Max: Fury Road Is the Greatest Film of Its Kind Ever Made.”

David Perry, Mad Max: Fury Road Is the Feminist Action Flick You’ve Been Waiting For.”

Armond White, “All Sound and Fury Road, Signifying Nothing.” (Perhaps the only negative review of Mad Max: Fury Road, and is it any surprise it’s coming from the conservative National Review?)

Sadie Doyle, “Age of Robots: How Marvel Is Killing the Popcorn Movie.”

Raffi Khatchadourian, “World without End: Creating a Full-Size Digital Cosmos,” on No Man’s Sky (forthcoming).

Melissa Locker, “David Lynch Is Headed to Twin Peaks (Again).”

“Pulitzer Prize Winning Poet Is a Columbia Student and Teacher.”

K. Silem Mohammad with Jeff Dolven, “Psychoanalytic Night at Hooters.”

Christopher Bollen, “A Very British Crime Scene: At Home with Agatha Christie.”

Thomas Frick, “An [Old] Interview with J. G. Ballard.”

Alexandra Levit, “Make Way for Generation Z.”

Chris Miller, “Why the Kremlin Reads Žižek.” 

Slavoj Žižek on West Side Story.

Jack Hamilton, “How Bill Simmons Changed Sports Writing.”

Albert Burneko, “Bill Simmons Is a Shitty Writer.”

Steven Craig Hickman, Dark Ecologies: The Carnival Edge of Post-Humanism.

The first page of Jonathan Franzen’s forthcoming Purity.

Paul Blest, “How Bernie Sanders Shaped the Northeast Punk Scene.”

Martin Woessner, “Brave NewWorlds,” review of Film Worlds: A Philosophical Aesthetics of Cinema, by Daniel Yacavone.

Eli Blasko, “Taylor Baldwin, Eutopia.”

Kevin Frances and Taylor Baldwin, “A Conversation between Kevin Frances and Taylor Baldwin.”

Rachel Wetzler, “The Reality TV Novel: Goldin and Senneby’s Headless also Lacks a Soul, but That’s Probably the Point.”

Reagan Arthur, Bonnie Nadell, Ethan Nosowsky, and Carolyn Kellogg, “Panel Discussion on Publishing.”

Nina Sabak, “A Lively, Hospitable Place for Poetry,” review of Rattle, no. 47 (Spring 2015).

Lee Konstantinou, “A Theory of Here.”

“National Poetry Month and Robin Clarke.”

And I directed an incredible independent study this spring: Sarah Lane‘s Chick Fight: The Battle Against Oppression and Inequality (2015), a feminist board game. Check it out. Support it. Buy it here. Play it. It’s amazing.

bAFLjIL

Geoffrey Glover and Bradley J. Fest playing Sarah Lane’s Chick Fight (18 April 2015).

 

 

Humanities and Higher Education

Todd Gitlin, “You Are Here to Be Disturbed: A Plague of Hypersensitivity“: “The unwritten contract of university education: I am here to be disturbed.”

MFA No MFA.

Matt Stromberg, “Entire First-Year MFA Class Drops Out in Protest at the University of Southern California.”

Mark Bauerlein, “What’s the Point of a Professor?”

Scott Eric Kaufman, “‘Academia Is the Titanic': Mark Bauerlein on Teaching in the Morally-bankrupt Grind of the New American University.”

The Tattooed Professor, “I Will Not Be Lectured To. I’m Too Busy Teaching.”

2015-2016 has been declared the “Year of the Humanities” at the University of Pittsburgh.

Andrew Hartman, “How Austerity Killed the Humanities.”

Jedediah Purdy, “Ayn Rand Comes to University of North Carolina.”

Deborah M. Todd, “Carnegie Mellon University Summit Encourages Creativity for the Common Good.”

Christy Wampole, “The Conference Manifesto.”

Vimal Patel, “The PhD Pay Gap.”

David Wescott, “Survival of the Fittest in the English Department.”

David J. McCowin, “An Adjunct’s Farewell.”

Hamilton Nolan, “Professor Failed the Whole Class.”

Chris Baker and Jacob Hansen, The Elements of F*cking Style: A Helpful Parody.

“Professor Deeply Hurt by Student’s Evaluation.”

 

Pittsburgh

Nicole Davis, “Could the Next Brooklyn Be Pittsburgh?”

Jon Schmitz, “Better Fiscal Health Leads Port Authority to Add Service.”


End of Semester Links, Spring 2015

April 23, 2015

I’m looking forward to a lot of exciting projects this summer, including some reviews, an interview, essays, and finishing the book. Like years past, I’ll be spending most of my days in front of the computer, I imagine, so you can expect many more links in the months to come. To start off:

 

Nuclear

Who knew there was such a thing?: The National Atomic Testing Museum.

 

Hyperarchival

“How the KGB Archives Will Be Opened and Information Declassified.”

 

Economics and Politics

Kevin Young and Dianna C. Sierra Becerra, “Hillary Clinton’s Empowerment.”

David A. Graham, “Too Late to Be President.”

Noam Chomsky, “The Crimes of Others.”

Connor Kilpatrick, “Let Them Eat Privilege.”

Nicole Aschoff, “The Free-Market Fantasy.”

Elias Isquith, “‘I Found Myself Turning into an Idiot': David Graeber Explains the Life-Sapping Reality of Bureaucratic Life.”

Keith A. Spencer, “Fear of a Capitalist Planet.”

 

Literature and Culture

M. H. Abrams (1912-2015): “One of the Greatest Professors in Cornell History Has Died.”

Günter Grass (1927-2015), “How I Spent the War.”

Adam Withnall, “Pope Francis Declares Evolution and Big Bang Theory Are Real and God Is Not ‘a Magician with a Magic Wand.'”

Adam Thirlwell, “It’s Still a Scandal!” review of The Most Dangerous Book: The Battle for James Joyce’s “Ulysses”, by Kevin Birmingham.

Audrey Watters, “Men (Still) Explain Technology to Me: Gender and Education Technology.”

Hamilton Nolan, “Why [Gawker has] Decided to Organize.”

Cecilia Capuzzi Simon, “Why Writers Love to Hate the MFA.”

Zachary Loeb, “A Dark, Warped Reflection,” review of Black Mirror.

Jacob Krell, “The Trouble with Clint” (Eastwood).

David L. Ulin, “California and the Literature of Water.”

Quinn Lester, “St. Cthulu in the Anthroposcene [sic].”

Rosie Clarke, “The Parody of Sovereignty,” review of Headless, by K. D. (Triple Canopy, Sternberg Press and Tensta Konsthall, 2015). (I guess my friend Alexander Provan is perhaps “more” than the book’s mere publisher.)

Cheryl Eddy, Nymphomaniac Director Lars Von Trier Is Making a Serial Killer TV Show.”

Forthcoming: Fredric Jameson, Raymond Chandler: The Detections of Totality (New York: Verso, November 2015).

Um, Fuller House?

Jonathan Moody, “Aubade (The Son Rising).”

Ryan Pierson, “Don Hertzfeldt, Digital Kitsch, the Apocalypse.”

And one of my graduating seniors just published a story: Monique Briones, “Kids These Days.”

 

Humanities and Higher Education

Scott McLemee, “Eco’s Echoes,” review of How to Write a Thesis, by Umberto Eco.

Chuck Ryback, “UW Struggle: Real People Edition.”

Nick Anderson, “Going for the Hard Sell as Interest in English Major Declines” and “Skipping Shakespeare? Yes, English Majors Can Often Bypass the Bard.”

Brandon Busteed, “College Is Worth It If You Have These Six Experiences.”

Charlie Post, “We’re All Precarious Now.”


Many April Links: Catching Up

April 10, 2015

Another semester is coming to a close, and I finally have a chance to sit down and sort through the backlog of links that have been piling up over the past few months. So, with no further ado, links.

 

Nuclear, Environment, Ruins

Thomas Erdbrink, “Iran’s Leaders Fall Into Line Behind Nuclear Accord.”

William J. Broad, “Hydrogen Bomb Physicist’s Book Runs Afoul of Energy Department.”

John R. Bolton, “To Stop Iran’s Bomb, Bomb Iran.” Um, no.

Douglas Birch and R. Jeffrey Smith, “South African Nuclear Cache Unnerves US.”

“South Africa Rebuffs US Attempts to Take Over Its Nuclear Material.”

Jon Greenberg, “The Odd Reality of Iran’s Centrifuges: Enough for a Bomb, Not Power.”

Charlie Jane Anders, “Nanotech Could Make Nuclear Bombs Much, Much Tinier.”

Andreas Malm, “The Anthropocene Myth.”

99% Invisible, “Ten Thousand Years.”

Emma Haslett, “Raycats and Earworms: How Scientists Are Using Colour-changing Cats and Nursery Rhymes to Warn Future Generations of Nuclear Danger.”

Jonathan Waldman, “The Rustiest Place in America.”

Jonathan Franzen, “Carbon Capture.”

Michael Schaub, “Jonathan Franzen ‘Miserably Conflicted’ About Climate Change.'”

Book trailer for Liam Sprod‘s Nuclear Futurism; The Work of Art in the Age of Remainderless Destruction (Winchester, UK: Zero, 2012).

 

National Security State and US Politics

Andrea Germanos, “Noam Chomsky: Edward Snowden a True Patriot Who Should be Honored.”

John Oliver on surveillance.

Amy Chozick and Maggie Haberman, “Hillary Clinton to Announce 2016 Run for President on Saturday.”

 

Economics

Vitalik Buterin with Sam Frank, “Decentralized Autonomous Society.”

Christina Pazzanese, “Explaining Capital.”

 

Hyperarchival

Julie Edgar, “A Rich Library of African-American Poetry Goes Digital.”

 

Literature and Culture

Mark Sussman, “Smarter.”

Adam Kotsko, “On the Perfunctoriness of House of Cards.”

Cory Doctorow, “How Heinlein Went From Socialist to Right-Wing Libertarian.”

Alexander R. Galloway, “Something About the Digital.”

Tom McCarthy, “The Death of Writing: If James Joyce Were Alive Today He’d Be Working for Google.”

Natalie Shapero, “Cold Comfort,” review of Lines the Quarry, by Robin ClarkeVestigial, by Page Hill Starzinger, and Go Find Your Father / A Famous Blues, by Harmony Holiday.

Jonathan Gatehouse, “America Dumbs Down.”

Lauren Oyler, “The Weird, Sexy, Touching Emails of Writer Kathy Acker.”

Charlie Jane Anders, “First Gorgeous Look at Mark Z. Danielewski’s New Series, The Familiar!”

Richard Hill, “The Internet vs. Democracy,” review of Digital Disconnect: How Capitalism Is Turning the Internet Against Democracy, by Robert W. McChesney.

Peter McDonald and Patrick Jagoda, The Portal | The Sandbox.

Sam Kriss, Game of Thrones and Marxist Theory.”

Leigh Gallagher, “The Suburbs Are Dead–And That’s Not a Good Thing.”

Mark Bittman, “Why Not Utopia?”

Javier O’Neil-Ortiz, “Inferiority Complex: On Black Mirror.”

Lawrence Berger, “Being There: Heidegger on Why Presence Matters.”

Ian Bogost, “Videogames Are Better Without Characters.”

Chay Close, “All Videogames Are a Joke.”

Spencer Robbins, “Wittgenstein, Schoolteacher.”

Jessica Saia and Sierra Hartman, “What Our Office Learned Working Naked for One Month.”

Kevin M. Kruse, “A Christian Nation? Since When?”

Black Metal Theory.

David Itzkoff, “Trevor Noah to Succeed Jon Stewart on The Daily Show.”

Footnotes (podcast on comic book series).

Snap Judgment, “The NeverEnding Story.”

Michael Idov, “The Movie Set That Ate Itself.” (An oldie, but goodie on Ilya Khrzhanovsky’s ambitious failure of a filmic megatext.)

The Brontosaurus is back.

Daniel Krupa, “The Emotional Storytelling of Everybody’s Gone to Rapture.”

“What if Wes Anderson Directed X-Men?”

“Marx Madness.”

Jason Schreier, “You Can Play Pac-Man on Google Maps Right Now.”

Jon Stewart knees a professional wrestler in the junk.

And the cast of Twin Peaks begs David Lynch to come back:

 

Humanities and Higher Education

Janet Napolitano, “Higher Education Isn’t in Crisis.”

Terry Eagleton, “The Slow Death of the University.”

Colleen Flaherty and Kaitlin Mulhere, “Day of Protest.”

Carmen Maria Machado, “O Adjunct! My Adjunct!”

Fareed Zakaria, “Why America’s Obsession with STEM Education Is Dangerous.”

Stephanie Saul, “NYU Professor Is Barred by United Arab Emirates.”

Laura McKenna, “The Unfortunate Fate of Sweet Briar’s Professors.”

Leonard Cassuto, “The Problem of Professionalization.”

Plugs, Play, Pedagogy, “Teaching with the Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives.”


Abstract: Geologies of Finitude: The Deep Time of Twenty-First Century Catastrophe in Don DeLillo’s Point Omega and Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia

February 20, 2015

Below is an abstract for a paper I will be presenting at the Louisville Conference on Literature and Culture Since 1900, taking place February 26-28, 2015. I will be presenting this paper on a panel titled, “Postcolonial Finance and Disaster Capitalism in Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Fiction.” The panel will be taking place 2:45 – 4:15 Saturday, February 28th, in room 122 of the Humanities Building at the University of Louisville.

Geologies of Finitude: The Deep Time of Twenty-First Century Catastrophe in Don DeLillo’s Point Omega and Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia

Abstract: The twenty-first century has seen a remarkable confluence and transformation of twentieth century narrative and historical discourse. On the one hand, the Cold War nuclear sense of an ending and US national fantasy of Mutually Assured Destruction has multiplied, producing a diverse array of eschatological imaginaries. Indeed, in the age of disaster capitalism, this multiplication has caused some to revise earlier concerns and to now suggest that we are “witnessing the attempt to imagine capitalism by way of imagining the end of the world.” On the other hand, there has been an increasing sobriety from a host of intellectuals and writers about human finitude, especially considered in light of the postnatural condition of the Anthropocene, with its present focus on deep ecological and cosmological futures. Human extinction is no longer shocking; it is a mute fact of geologic time. At the intersection of multiplying, immediate, and local disaster—both real and imagined—and a perspective on the deep history of human finitude, this paper will argue that Don DeLillo’s Point Omega (2010) and Iranian writer Reza Negarestani’s remarkable Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials (2008) make strong cases for the novel’s continuing ability to complicate and illuminate human finitude and historical temporality in contemporaneity. Written in the midst of the long and disastrous US incursions in the Middle East from two distinct transnational, philosophical, and aesthetic standpoints, DeLillo and Negarestani raise important political questions about vital materiality in the age of hyperobjects and the ecological realities of the War on Terror. In decidedly different and complimentary ways, each novel acknowledges that though the twenty-first century has made it clear that the catastrophic present cannot be divorced from the inevitable doom at the end of the world, we still desperately need to imagine something else.


February Links

February 20, 2015

It’s that time of year when I’m busy busy with all sorts of things. Combined with the miserable weather (it got down to -11° Fahrenheit in Pittsburgh last night), some links have been piling up.

 

Environment, Science, International, Disaster

Rebecca Solnit, “The Age of Capitalism Is Over.”

Noam Chomsky, “The World of Our Grandchildren.”

Graeme Wood, “What ISIS Really Wants.”

Raymond T. Pierrehumbert, “Climate Hacking Is Barking Mad.”

Sam Kriss, “Manifesto of the Committee to Abolish Outer Space.”

Cari Romm, “How Three People Can Make a Baby.”

Alan Taylor, “What Record-Breaking Snow Really Looks Like.”

 

Hyperarchival

Conor Friedersdorf, “The NSA’s Director of Civil Liberties Renounces Secret Law.”

Julie Beck, “Losing the Internet You Grew Up With.”

Manuel Correa, “The Philosophical Origins of Digitality,” an interview with Alexander R. Galloway.

Jonathan Goodwin, “Is the Network a Brain?” a review of The Cybernetic Brain: Sketches of Another Future by Andrew Pickering.

Gavin Mueller, “Trickster Makes This Web: The Ambiguous Politics of Anonymous,” a review of Hacker, Hoaxer, Whistleblower, Spy: The Many Faces of Anonymous, Gabriella Coleman.

Adam Chandler, “A Warehouse Fire of Digital Memories.”

Preserved 1956 kitchen.

 

Literature and Culture

“Evening Will Come,” The Volta Tribute to  Tomaž Šalamun.

Stephen Maher, “The Lost Counterculture: Inherent Vice Brilliantly Depicts How Neoliberalism Co-Opted the Counterculture.”

Megan Garber, “Harper Lee: The Sadness of a Sequel.”

Jessa Crispin, “Don’t Do It Harper Lee.”

Zadie Smith, “Brother From Another Mother: Key and Peele’s Chameleon Comedy.”

Adam Kotsko, “Nice to Meat You.”

Janet Maslin, “In Layered Fiction and Wry Notes to Mom, a Cosmic Genius Distilled,” a review of The David Foster Wallace Reader: A Compilation.

Parul Seghal, “Fresh Terrain in Huck Finn’s Adventure,” a review of Huck Finn’s America: Mark Twain and the Era That Shaped His Masterpiece, by Andrew Levy.

Matt Taibbi, American Sniper Is Almost Too Dumb to Criticize.”

Carolyn Kellogg, “With Holy Cow, David Duchovny Is Finally, Officially a Novelist.” (An interview with Duchovny.)

A very interesting sounding new collection of essays, Postmodern Literature and Race, edited by Len Platt and Sara Upstone, and including an esssay by Samuel Cohen, “The Whiteness of David Foster Wallace.” (Read a bit here.)

Stephen Squibb, “The Last Days of Football.”

Rudi Batzell, “Socialize Football.”

Adam Chandler, “America’s Ugly Super Bowl.”

Adam Chandler, “Exit Jon Stewart.”

David Sims, “Jon Stewart Is Going Out On Top.”

Amy Poehler should take over for Jon Stewart. Just saying.

Juliet Lapidos, “Wait, What, I’m a Millennial?” (I knew it.)

Alexander Tucker, “Video Games: Offered by Universities?”

David Sims, “Could The Legend of Zelda Really Work on Television?”

Melody Nixon, “Topical Poetry: An Interview with Jonathan Moody.”

Cassette Gods, review of NAH, Otheration.

Steph Roman, Shadow of the Colossus: Boss Fight Ecology.”

Dan Kubis, “The Shrinking Power of Punk.”

Nathan Grayson, “A Game About Taking Selfies as a Skeleton. That’s It.”

Peter Schultz, “Artistic Movements’ Favorite Drinking Games.”

And The Raphael Parable:

 

Humanities and Higher Education

Sydni Dunn, “Where Do English PhDs Get Jobs? It Depends on Where They Studied.” (Indeed.)

Colleen Flaherty, “Closed Networks.”

Michael Mirer, “Scott Walker Thinks My University Has Fat to Trim, Yet My Department Is Barely Scraping By.”

Claudia Klein Felske, “An Open Letter to Government Walker.”

Conor Friedersdorf, “What HBO Can Teach Colleges About ‘Trigger Warnings.”


Robin Mackay’s “A Brief History of Geotrauma”

February 14, 2015

I have been working on Reza Negarestani‘s Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials (2008) and I ran across this fascinating introduction to Negarestani by Robin Mackay that I cannot help but share. The work below is tilted “A Brief History of Geotrauma, or: The Invention of Negarestani.”


January Links

January 29, 2015

Environmental

“Did the Anthropocene Begin with the Nuclear Age?”

Lyn Ringenberg, “A Dramatic Doomsday Warning to the World.” The Doomsday clock has been moved closer to midnight.

 

Hyperarchival

Jill Lepore, “The Cobweb: Can the Internet Be Archived?”

Alexander R. Galloway, “Network Pessimism.”

David M. Berry, “Flat Theory.”

Sandy Baldwin, The Internet Unconscious: On the Subject of Electronic Literature.

Ian Bogost, “Introducing the Supertweet.”

Lorne Cook, “YouTube Says It’s Too Overwhelmed to Keep Terrorist Videos Off the Site.”

Adam Greenfield with Matthew Shen Goodwin, “Too Smart for Their Own Good.”

 

International

Richard Seymour, “On Charlie Hebdo.”

Teju Cole, “Unmournable Bodies.”

Gabriel Bristow, “The Next Front Against Austerity.”

 

National Security State

David E. Sanger and Martin Fackler, “NSA Breached North Korean Networks Before Sony Attack, Officials Say.”

 

US Politics

Nathan J. Robinson, “Money Talks.”

Jamala Rogers, “Selma Is Now.”

Thomas J. Sugrue, “Restoring King.”

 

Literature and Culture

Aisha Harris, “Watch Larry Wilmore Kick Off The Nightly Show by Assessing ‘The State of the Black Protest.’”

Mary Morris interviews Margaret Atwood.

Ian Goodrum, American Sniper, or Stolz der Nation.” (I just had the opportunity to read Kenneth Burke’s “The Rhetoric of Hitler’s ‘Battle'” for the first time, and think that we would do well to consider American Sniper seriously, as a text with obvious and significant rhetorical power, along the same kinds of critical lines Burke lays out in that essay. I owe R. for this thought.)

Rory Fanning, “Learning from American Sniper.”

Elias Isquith, “Our American Sniper Sickness: How American Exceptionalism Wrought Guantanamo.”

Aaron Bady, “American Snipper.”

Katie Kilkenny, Leviathan: An Incisive Take on Russia Even Putin Couldn’t Ignore.”

Frank Pasquale, “To Replace or Respect: Futurology as if People Mattered,” a review of Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee, The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies.

Mike Bulajewski, “What Drives Automation?” a review of Nicholas Carr, The Glass Cage: Automation and Us.

Colin Dayan, “Thinking the Permissible, or Speaking in Common.”

Tomaž Šalamun reading and in conversation with David Rivard.

And  André Naffis-Sahely, “The Post-Šalamunian Period.”

 

Humanities and Higher Education

W. H. Auden’s syllabus. (I cannot even imagine how undergraduates would react to a class like this today. . . .)

Dan Berrett, “The Day the Purpose of College Changed.”

Jacques Berlinerblau, “Teach or Perish.”

Bill Chappell, “Student Tuition Now Outweighs State Funding at Public Colleges.”

Colleen Flaherty, “Major Exodus: Where Have All the English Majors Gone?”

And Lucy McCalmont, “Scott Walker Urges Professors to Work Harder.” Um.

 

Pittsburgh

“Lawrenceville Seceds from City of Pittsburgh to Form First Hipster Republic.”


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