Geologies of Finitude: The Deep Time of Twenty-First-Century Catastrophe in Don DeLillo’s Point Omega and Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia

July 15, 2016

Geologies of Finitude: The Deep Time of Twenty-First-Century Catastrophe in Don DeLillo’s Point Omega and Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia

I am pleased to report that my essay, “Geologies of Finitude: The Deep Time of Twenty-First-Century Catastrophe in Don DeLillo’s Point Omega and Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia,” was just published in the most recent issue of Critique: Studies in Contemporary Fiction. This essay has been in the works for some time, and I am happy to see it emerge into the light of day. (It is also behind a paywall, but I’d be happy to send it along to anyone who is interested.)

An abstract: The twenty-first century has seen a transformation of twentieth-century narrative and historical discourse. On the one hand, the cold war national fantasy of mutually assured destruction has multiplied, producing a diverse array of apocalyptic visions. On the other, there has been an increasing sobriety about human finitude, especially considered in the light of emerging discussions about deep time. This essay argues that Don DeLillo’s Point Omega (2010) and Reza Negarestani’s Cyclonopedia: Complicity with Anonymous Materials (2008) make strong cases for the novel’s continuing ability to complicate and illuminate contemporaneity. Written in the midst of the long and disastrous United States incursions in the Middle East, DeLillo and Negarestani raise important political questions about the ecological realities of the War on Terror. Each novel acknowledges that though the catastrophic present cannot be divorced from the inevitable doom at the end of the world, we still desperately need to imagine something else.

 


Review of David Foster Wallace and “The Long Thing” at C21: Journal of 21st-Century Writings

April 21, 2016

David Foster Wallace and the Long ThingProduct Details

In the fourth issue of the new journal, C21: Journal of 21st-Century Writings, Mark West has written a nicely positive review of David Foster Wallace and “The Long Thing”: New Essays on the Novels (2014), edited by Marshall Boswell, in which I have an essay, “‘Then Out of the Rubble’: David Foster Wallace’s Early Fiction.” West also reviews Gesturing Towards Reality: David Foster Wallace and Philosophy (2014), edited by Robert K. Bolger and Scott Korb (somewhat less positively).


An Interview with Jonathan Arac

March 30, 2016

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I just published “An Interview with Jonathan Arac” in the most recent issue of boundary 2. I am honored to have had the chance to interview Arac, who has been such a important mentor to me in so many ways. An even further honor is having the interview appear in an issue with work by Tom Eyers, David Golumbia, McKenzie Wark, and others, along with Bruce Robbins’s interview of Orhan Pamuk and Jeffrey J. Williams’s interview of Wai Chee Dimock. What a fantastic issue.


Six Sonnets: 2014.01 – 2014.06

October 13, 2015

Six more of sonnets from the ongoing project just appeared in Empty Mirror.


2015.02 in Small Po(r)tions

October 1, 2015

A sonnet from an ongoing sequence just appeared in issue 5 of Small Po(r)tions magazine. Check out “2015.02.” More poems from this project are on their way in a couple weeks.


2015 Tomaž Šalamun Prize

August 20, 2015

I am happy to announce that I was a finalist for the 2015 Tomaž Šalamun Prize and will be publishing a number of poems–including a twenty page long poem, “The Shape of Things II”–in Verse later this year. Congratulations to Felicia Zamora, whose portfolio, Of Unknowing, was selected as the winner of the prize. The contest was judged by Brian Henry.


Response from Alexander R. Galloway

August 3, 2015

Alexander R. Galloway has quite generously and critically responded to a recent review I wrote about his book, The Interface Effect (2012), in “Allegories of Control.”


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